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    Change History
     

    Date changed
    Change details
    Reason for change
    (if applicable)
    Responsible for change

    March 16, 2017
    All topics added
     
    All team members

    March 18, 2017
    Formatting, editing
    Revision
    Name Name

    March 24, 2017
    Revisions and additional topics added
     
    All team members

    March 26, 2017
    Formatting, editing
    Revision
    Hera Haizel

    March 31, 2017
    Project Objectives
    Revision
    Name Name

    April 1, 2017
    Responsibility Matrix, MSP file
    Revision
    Name Name

    April 2, 2017
    Formatting, editing
    Revision
    Name Name

    April 5, 2017
    Project Risk Management
    Section added
    Name Name

     
     
    Table of Contents
    Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market      4
    Project Overview and Purpose           4
    Project Scope Statement         4
    Project Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
    Project Deliverables……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6
    Project Phase Breakout……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
    Project Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7
    Project Milestones………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
    Project Organization…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9
    Project Communications         13
    Project Budget            16
    Project Risk Management       18
    References      Error! Bookmark not defined.
    Appendix A – Project Charter            23
    Appendix B – Risk Register   32
     
     
    Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market
    Sunshine Design Planning Company (SDPC) is a construction company working in partnership with the Food Trust to bring Farmers’ markets to neighborhoods that otherwise lack healthy foods. Many of these markets accepts food stamp benefits to make all foods affordable to everyone.
    The Community Memorial Hospital (CMH) in Washington, DC plans to build a farmers’ market on an empty 5-acre plot they own next to the hospital. SDPC is a contractor that specializes in building markets that operate year round to help promote health.
    Project Overview and Purpose
    The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market will provide a necessary source for healthy food options for the community, employees and patients of CMH. This ties in with their goal of making healthy foods accessible to their community.
    Given that SDPC specializes in planning and building farmers’ markets, adding another market to their portfolio will increase their chances of obtaining more contracts to build more markets in the future. Working in partnership with the Food Trust also ensures that food stamps will be accepted at these markets which provides the accessibility to low income individuals and families.
    Project Scope Statement
    SDPC will construct a single rectangular shape, permanent pavilion structure for a medium sized farmers’ market on the 5-acre plot that resides next to the CMH.  The structure will be constructed directly over a flat concrete slab of approximately 12,000 square feet in size.  This will allow roughly 200 square feet for vendor space with loading and unloading access of goods as well as customer access to vendor booths.  This space will permit 31 to 50 local vendor booths along both sides of the concrete slab (long ways) and a main customer footpath up the middle. Two parking spaces will be available for each vendor booth on each side of the pavilion and 250 parking spaces available for customers in the front of the pavilion.  Bike parking and restrooms will also be available for patrons and vendors.
    Construction will start after all building permits are submitted and approved and the weather allows.  The CMH will have final approval with all unexpected changes in case a problem arises during construction.  The final budget for the construction of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market is $1,070,000.
    Project Objectives
    A successful completion of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market project will consist of these objectives:

    Objective 1:  Hold a community meeting for neighboring organizations and businesses while permits are being obtained and before construction starts on the project, before 5-8-2017. This is to disseminate information about the upcoming site and to receive community feedback.
    Objective 2:  Hold a traffic pattern study before the construction of the parking lot, 12-4-2017, to determine if traffic lights are needed.
    Objective 3: The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market must also obtain a DC Certified Food Protection Manager Identification Card to operate (DC, 2017). This certification will be done by February of 2018.
    Objective 4: The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market will have at least thirty-one vendors by February of 2018.  This is 62% of the vendor capacity for the market

    Project Deliverables

    Architecture Plan: The plan will be submitted for CMH approval before start of building
    Farmers’ Market Permit: Approved permits for market before start of building
    Building Permits: Approved permits before building start date
    Sidewalk Permits: approved permits for sidewalks
    Opening of Pavilion: when all inspections have been completed and the building has been approved for habitation
    Opening of Parking lot: when all inspections have been completed and has been approved use.
    Landscaping: create landscaping around market after all building has been completed
    Vendors: Will have about 90% of vendors to fill the market by end project.

    Project Phase Breakout
    The Fresh Harvest Farmer’s Market construction will be completed in five phases. In the table below, Sunshine Design Planning Company will be involved in site preparation, farmer’s market pavilion, parking lot construction, landscaping, and clean up/final inspection of the new facility. These phases will be completed by Sunshine Design Planning Company by May 18, 2018. Sunshine Design Planning Company will, with the permission of the project manager and sponsor, extend these phase dates if there are unexpected delays during the project.
    Table 1.1: Project Phases

    Phases
    Actions
    Durations
    (weeks)
    Dates

    Site Preparation
    Site clearing site of trees and obstacles;
    Site survey to line out exact position of building, parking lot and sidewalks;
    Soil testing
    Site plan design
    10 weeks
    April 3, 2017 – June 12, 207

    Market Pavilion
    Prepare site and pour foundation
    Complete framing
    Complete plumbing, electricals and HVAC
    Complete drywall, interior fixtures, start exterior finishes
    Finish interior trim
    Install bathroom fixtures
    Install mirrors, doors, finish flooring
    30 weeks
    July 3, 2017 – January 15, 2018

    Parking lot Construction
    Grade driveway scope to achieve proper drainage
    Compact the base soil
    Cover the base soil with crushed rock
    Allow base to settle
    Choose asphalt size and thickness
    Compact asphalt with heavy roller
    Treat edges of driveway
    Build formwork for sidewalks
    Pour concrete, level and smooth
    Finish concrete on sidewalk
    20 weeks
    December 11, 2017 – April 26, 2018

    Landscaping
    Prepare a site analysis
    Draw preliminary designs
    Till soil
    Start planting
    3 weeks
    April 30, 2018 – May 21, 2018

    Clean up/Final Inspection
    Remove all material and equipment used from site
    Inspect site
    1 week
    May 22, 2018 – May 31, 2018

     
    Project Requirements
    The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market project requirements:

    Pour the 12,000-square foot concrete slab (160 ft. x 75 ft.) for the floor of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market.
    Construct the main permanent pavilion structure for shade and protection from the elements. 31-50 farmer slots will be available. Approximately 30 small farmer slots (10ft x 15ft) and 20 larger slots (10ft x 30ft) will be available.
    Construct separate bathroom facilities for men and women under the pavilion at far end of market (50 ft. x 20 ft.) for the market guests and vendors. 3 stalls for the women’s room with 2 sinks, 1 stall and 2 urinals in the men’s room with 2 sinks.
    Construct permanent bike parking structures for each end of the pavilion for patrons and vendors.  Eight Steel Park-It galvanized PLUS bike racks (fits five bikes), two on each side of guest main entrance and two on each side of vendor main entrance.
    Create a U-shaped asphalt parking lot that surrounds the Pavilion (three main parking lots) for access to each side of the pavilion for vendors and then a main parking lot for market guests in front of the market.
    Create sidewalks that are accessible to the main hospital, street and parking lots for all market participants.
    Create access to parking lot from main road and hospital main parking lot for vehicle access.
    Create appealing landscaping around the parking lot and sidewalks leading up from the street and hospital.  Include park benches and lamp posts

    Project Milestones
    Table 1.2: Project Milestones

    ID
    Active
    Task Mode
    Name
    Duration
    (Days)
    Start
    Finish
    Predecessors
    Outline
    Level
    Notes

    1
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Farmer’s Markets Permits
    26
    4/3/2017 8:00
    5/8/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    2
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Receiving
    permits for construction/building on empty lot
    21
    5/8/2017 8:00
    6/5/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    3
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Phase I Complete
    1
    6/12/2017 8:00
    6/12/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    4
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Bathroom plumbing
    16
    7/3/2017 8:00
    7/24/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    5
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Pour concrete slab
    25
    8/2/2017 8:00
    9/5/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    6
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Construct pavilion
    26
    10/2/2017 8:00
    11/6/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    7
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Construct bathroom
    31
    11/27/2017 8:00
    1/8/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    8
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Phase II Complete
    1
    1/15/2018 8:00
    1/15/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    9
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Parking Lot Permits
    21
    11/6/2017 8:00
    12/4/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    10
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Parking lot construction
    46
    12/11/2017 8:00
    2/12/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    11
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Sidewalks permits
    21
    2/19/2018 8:00
    3/19/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    12
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Sidewalk construction
    16
    3/24/2017 8:00
    4/14/2017 17:00
     
    1
     

    13
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Phase III Completed
    1
    4/26/2018 8:00
    4/26/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    14
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Landscaping
    21
    4/30/2018 8:00
    5/21/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    15
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Phase IV Completed
    1
    5/22/2018 8:00
    5/22/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    16
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Clean Up/Inspection
    10
    5/22/2018 8:00
    5/31/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

    17
    Yes
    Manually Scheduled
    Phase V Completed
    1
    5/31/2018 8:00
    5/31/2018 17:00
     
    1
     

     
    Project Organization
    SDPC has a matrix organization structure. Based on the projects that the company works on; the matrix structure allows employees from different departments to work on a project.
    SDPC’s organization consists of a President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), who has an Executive Assistant. The CEO has four Vice Presidents reporting to him: VP of Design, VP of Architecture, VP of Construction and VP of Project Management. All VPs have administrative assistants.
    Hera Haizel, the project manager on the Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market project and all other project managers on different projects report to the VP of Project Management. He oversees all ongoing projects for the SDPC. Each project manager has a project coordinator as an assistant. Staff members are pulled from different departments to create a project management team when there is a new project.
    The organizational chart below shows the structure of SDPC.
    Figure 1 Sunshine Design Planning Company
     

    Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for the planning, execution and managing of budget of the project till conclusion. The manager is also the point of contact with stakeholders. The project manager reports to the VP of Project Management.
    Project Coordinator: The project coordinator is responsible for administrative duties, coordinating activities, resources, equipment and information and to bring to the project manager’s attention any issues that may arise. The project coordinator reports to the project manager.
    Design Staff: The designer is responsible for reviewing the interior of the building and making sure it is built to design specifications. May work with the architect in some cases to ensure the successful completion of the job at hand.
    Architecture Staff: The architect is responsible for the clarification of design to the construction team; redesign or make changes where necessary; review detailed plans to make sure the original design is built and to certify that work has been completed in a correct manner.
    Construction Staff: The contractor from the construction department is responsible for all the material, equipment and services necessary for the construction of the project. The contractor must review all processes which accompanies the building of structures.

    Work Breakdown Structure
    Figure 2 Work Breakdown Structure of Project
     
    Responsibility Assignment Matrix
    Table 1.3: Responsibility Matrix
    Project Communications
    Communications is a key feature to any successful project.  SPDC strives to make communication with appropriate persons a priority.  Status reports on the project will be conducted bi-monthly by the PM with a one-on-one meeting with CMH, SPDC and community leaders.  Hard copies of the status reports will also be available to participants.  Project evaluations will also be discussed by one-on-one meetings and hard copies by the PM but on a monthly basis with SPDC, CMH and the PM team members.  Objectives will be handled differently by communicating through PM and PM team members, if needed, with emails on a bi-weekly basis to CMH and SPDC. A one-on-one meeting along with hard copies will be conducted and given monthly by PM and the PM team to communicate milestones of the project with CMH, SPDC and community leaders.
    Any risks will be communicated to CMH on a monthly schedule through email.  The PM and SPDC will be responsible for communicated these project risks.  Any issues that develop will be discussed on a as required frequency only.  The PM will discuss any issues that evolve with various leaders and persons depending on the issue.  Team status reports are important to the life of the project and will be looked over once every two months or bi-weekly by the PM and PM team members.  Team status reports will be discussed through team leaders.
    Table 1.4: Communication Matrix

    Communication Matrix

    Audience
    Project Information
    Method of Communication
    Frequency
    Who is Responsible

    CMH, SDPC, Community Leader
    Status Reports on Project
     Face-to-Face Meeting with Hard Copy
    Bi-Monthly
    PM

    Project Management Team, PM
    Status Reports on Team
     Face-to-Face Meeting and Email
    Weekly
    Team Leaders

    SPDC, CMH, Project Management Team
    Project Evaluation
     Face-to-Face Meeting and Hard Copy
    Monthly
    PM

    Dependent on Issue
    Issues
     Face-to-Face Meeting, Email and Hard Copy
    As Required
    PM

    CMH and SPDC
    Objectives
    Email
    Bi-weekly
    PM, Project Management Team

    CMH
    Risks
    Email
    Monthly
    PM, SPDC

    CMH, SDPC, Community Leader
    Milestones
     Face-to-Face Meeting and Hard Copy
    Monthly
    PM, Project Management Team

    Project Gantt Chart
    A Gantt chart demonstrates the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the work breakdown structure of the project. In order to complete the construction of this project (Farmers’ market) a Gantt chart is used in order to assure all tasks on the project are completed on time from start date of construction to inspecting and clean up. Meetings will be taken once a month to ensure the team is on the same page and duties assigned. Gantt charts have become a common technique for representing the phases and activities of a project work breakdown structure, so they can be understood by a wide audience.
    Figure 3 Fresh Harvest Gantt Chart
    Project Budget
    SDPC’s PM team has broken down the budget into the 6 phases of the project by using bottom-up approach for estimating the cost of the building of the Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market. The PM team has established the estimating cost, labor and duration of the budget for each of these phases represented in the project cost breakdown below: Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market Phase, Labor and Equipment/Materials Budget Breakdown. There is another simplified table with budget broken down further into labor and equipment/materials: Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market Phase, Labor and Equipment/Materials Budget Breakdown. This table is also represented below. According to A4Architect.com the division of labor and equipment/materials is averaged at 40% for labor and 60% of equipment/materials (Gichuhi, 2013). SPDC specializes in building and planning farmers’ markets all over the country and will use these estimations for the duration of the CMH project.
    Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market Phase, Labor and Duration Budget Breakdown:
     

    Site Preparation

    Estimated Cost: $7,750
    Estimated Labor: 80 hours
    Duration: 10 days

    Building
    Building Permits

    Estimated Cost: $2,500
    Estimated Labor: 176
    Duration: 22 days

    Pour 12,000 sqft concrete slab (160ft. x 75 ft.)

    Estimated Cost: $100,000
    Estimated Labor: 176 hours
    Duration: 22 days

    Construct the permanent pavilion structure over concrete slab (160ft x 75ft)

    Estimated Cost: $180,000
    Estimated Labor: 176 hours
    Duration: 22 days
     

    Construct bathroom facilities under pavilion (far end of market) @ 50ft x 20ft

    Estimated Cost: $100,000
    Estimated Labor: 336 hours
    Duration: 42 days

    Construct 4 permanent bike parking structures (Eight Steel Park-It galvanized PLUS bike racks for five bikes)

    Estimated Cost: $10,000
    Estimated Labor: 80 hours
    Duration: 10 days

    Community Meeting

    Estimated Cost: $1,000
    Estimated Labor: 40 hours
    Duration: 5 days

    Parking Lot

    Traffic Pattern Study

    Estimated Cost: $2,500
    Estimated Labor: 80 hours
    Duration: 10 days

    Parking Lot/Sidewalk Permits

    Estimated Cost: $5,000
    Estimated Labor: 336 hours
    Duration: 42 days

    Create a U-Shaped parking lot that surrounds pavilion

    Estimated Cost: $290,000
    Estimated Labor: 336 hours
    Duration: 42 days

    Create accessible sidewalks

    Estimated Cost: $100,000
    Estimated Labor: 176 hours
    Duration: 22 days

    Vendors

    List of Restricted and Non Restricted Foods

    Estimated Cost: $1,000
    Estimated Labor: 40 hours
    Duration: 5 days

    Obtain a DC Certified Food Protection Manager Identification Card

    Estimated Cost: $1,500
    Estimated Labor: 176 hours
    Duration: 22 days

    Landscaping
    Estimated Cost: $100,000

    Estimated Labor: 176 hours
    Duration: 22 days
     

    Clean up/Final Inspection
    Estimated Cost: $8,750

    Estimated Labor: 80 hours
    Duration: 10 days
     
    Miscellaneous Indirect Costs:
    Overhead Cost: $90,000
    7% Award Fee: $70,000
     
    Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market Phase, Labor and Equipment/Materials Budget Breakdown:
     
    Table 1.5: Market Phase, Labor, Equipment/Materials Breakdown

    Phase/Work Packages
    Labor (40%)
    Equipment/Materials (60%)
     
    Costs

    Site Preparations
    $3,100
    $4,650
     
    $7,750

    Building
    $156,000
    $235,000
     
    $391,000

    Parking Lot
    $160,000
    $240,000
     
    $400,000

    Vendors
    $1,000
    $1,500
     
    $2,500

    Landscaping
    $40,000
    $60,000
     
    $100,000

    Clean Up/ Final Inspection
    $3,500
    $5,250
     
    $8,750

    Misc. Indirect Costs
    n/a
    n/a
     
    $160,000

     
    Project Risk Management
    The task of risk management is to cover the essential risks as completely as possible. Risk identification must therefore be carried out in a way that is both forward-looking and in line with the progress of the project, since before the start of the project not all risks are completely recognizable and during the project implementation further risks may emerge. (Schieg, 2006)
    Risk Identification
    Construction jobs are complex and unique as are the risks that come with them. In identifying the risks for the construction of the Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market, SDPC reviewed its project charter, project scope and past projects. Identifying risks and managing them is important to SDPC as this helps in meeting all project objectives and requirements. If risks are ignored, they end up impacting the project or SDPC negatively. The risks are listed below:

    Financial risk: Price increase in materials and resources
    Project risks: Architecture or design errors, lack of proper project management
    People management: Potential conflict between team members or construction staff
    Time management: delays in meeting project objectives
    Occupational/Safety risk: Injuries to staff or property due to weather, negligence, technology, or methodology on construction sites
    Stakeholder risk: communication problems, misunderstanding on deliverables, insufficiency of funds to complete project, stakeholder changes to project plan that affect deliverables
    Natural risks: Weather affecting or damaging construction sites
    External risks: permit delays, issues in meeting Department of Health requirements

    Risk Assessment
    [Describe how your organization will assess risks and why this method of risk assessment is appropriate for your project. Briefly describe the risk assessment process, define the scale you will use to assess the risks (i.e., High Impact=50% additional cost to the activity or project, or High Probability = terminate project). Illustrate your risk assessment using a risk assessment matrix. With the results of the risk assessment (prioritized risk based on risk assessment), update the Risk Register in Appendix B.]
    Risk Response
    After a thorough review of risks, the team found methods to respond to positive and negative risks.  There are many actions for negative and positive risk response.  For negative risk responses there will be avoidance, transfer, mitigate, and acceptance of the risk.  For positive risks, there will be exploitation of risks, enhance risks, share risks, and acceptance.  For positive risks, such as weather affecting site, the project team should accept certain risks due to possessing little control over these matters.  Also, delay in permit approvals and meeting DOH requirements should be accepted because the design company, hospital, and certain staff will manage to meet the requirements in a timely manner.  Based on the assessment, the risks range from low, medium, and high probability of happening.  Safety hazards are considered a major high risk issue and should be mitigated during the project by enacting certain rules and regulations; establishing and training staff on safety procedures will reduce these high risks.  Staff and team conflict can be handled through transference by establishing agreements over which tasks each team member will perform during the project.  Also, architecture/design errors can be mitigated by ensuring measurements are accurate and adequate testing of building materials, and that the construction team is following directions from the architecture and construction management. Materials /Resource Cost can be transferred by establishing an agreement of which party will finance or provide certain resources for the duration of the project.  The stakeholder has a significant, moderate risk, and that the project team should mitigate the risk by following the stakeholder’s guidelines in regards to resources and other issues within the project.
    Risk Monitor and Control
    Risks are handled in various ways because of their different and potential effects on a project. In this case, project managers anticipate financial, natural, professional, or external risks, which they ought to approach in three ways, namely by monitoring and controlling the identified risks, anticipate new risks, and prevent all negative possibilities. For example, according to Pritchard (2014), the project management team should be alert to new financial risks by monitoring suppliers and ensuring that their products meet set quality standards.
    risks should be managed by preventive means; implying that a project manager should implement all measures to avoid occurrence of the identified hazards. Hence, management of team members will be monitored by maintaining constant communication among staff and resolving any emergent conflicts. Equally, the company will place harsh conditions for employees who report to work late. To manage occupational risks, the organization insists that its staff wear protective gear, and in case of injury, there is an equipped first aid box which can be used to offer emergency treatment. Other risks such as fires are also covered via constant training and fire drills during the project.
    New risks are also inevitable in a construction project. For example, a conflict with the management or fellow staff may cause some workers to quit, which would develop a new risk of employee shortage. Contrarily, the team may be underperforming, and the company may require new hires, which is a new risk that can develop in people management. In such a case, the firm will contact staffs that were initially interviewed for the jobs. Natural disasters may also demean the materials bought and highlight the need to purchase more materials. In this case, the budget covers miscellaneous expenses; therefore, the company can be able to afford more equipment.

     
     
    Appendix A – Project Charter
     
    Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market
    Sunshine Design Planning Company (SDPC) is a construction company working in partnership with the Food Trust to bring Farmers’ markets to neighborhoods that otherwise lack healthy foods. Many of these markets accepts food stamp benefits to make all foods affordable to everyone.
    The Community Memorial Hospital (CMH) in Washington, DC plans to build farmers’ market on an empty 5-acre plot they own next to the hospital. SDPC is a contractor that specializes in building markets that operate year round to help promote health.
    Purpose for the project
    The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market will provide a necessary source for healthy food options for the community, employees and patients of CMH. This ties in with their goal of making healthy foods accessible to their community.
    Given that SDPC specializes in planning and building farmers’ markets, adding another market to their portfolio will increase their chances of obtaining more contracts to build more markets in the future. Working in partnership with the Food Trust also ensures that food stamps will be accepted at these markets which provides the accessibility to low income individuals and families.
    Project Scope Statement
    SDPC will construct a single rectangular shape, permanent pavilion structure for a medium sized farmers’ market on the 5-acre plot that resides next to the CMH.  The structure will be constructed directly over a flat concrete slab of approximately 12,000 square feet in size.  This will allow roughly 200 square feet for vendor space with loading and unloading access of goods as well as customer access to vendor booths.  This space will permit 31 to 50 local vendor booths along both sides of the concrete slab (long ways) and a main customer footpath up the middle. Two parking spaces will be available for each vendor booth on each side of the pavilion and 250 parking spaces available for customers in the front of the pavilion.  Bike parking and restrooms will also be available for patrons and vendors.
    Construction will start after all building permits are submitted and approved and the weather allows.  The CMH will have final approval with all unexpected changes in case a problem arises during construction.  The final budget for the construction of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market is $1,070,000.
    Project objectives
    A successful completion of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market project will consist of these objectives:

    Objective 1:  Hold a community meeting for neighboring organizations and businesses to disseminate information about the upcoming site and to receive community feedback.
    Objective 2:  Hold a traffic pattern study before the construction of the parking lot to determine if traffic lights are needed.
    Objective 3: List of what goods are not restricted (i.e. uncut fruits and vegetables; nuts), moderately restricted (cut fruit and baked goods), and completely restricted (i.e. sandwiches made at home) for sale at the market.
    Objective 4: The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market must also obtain a DC Certified Food Protection Manager Identification Card to operate (DC, 2017).
    Objective 5: The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market will have at least thirty-one vendors by February of 2018.  This is 62% of the vendor capacity for the market.

    Project requirements
    The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market project requirements:

    Pour the 12,000-square foot concrete slab (160 ft. x 75 ft.) for the floor of The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market.
    Construct the main permanent pavilion structure for shade and protection from the elements. 31-50 farmer slots will be available depending on vendor booth size.
    Construct bathroom facilities under the pavilion at far end of market (50 ft. x 20 ft.) for the market guests and vendors.
    Construct permanent bike parking structures for each end of the pavilion for patrons and vendors.  Eight Steel Park-It galvanized PLUS bike racks (fits five bikes), two on each side of guest main entrance and two on each side of vendor main entrance.
    Create a U-shaped parking lot that surrounds the Pavilion (three main parking lots) for access to each side of the pavilion for vendors and then a main parking lot for market guests in front of the market.
    Create sidewalks that are accessible to the main hospital, street and parking lots for all market participants.
    Create access to parking lot from main road and hospital main parking lot for vehicle access.
    Create appealing landscaping around the parking lot and sidewalks leading up from the street and hospital.  Include park benches and lamp posts.

    Project risks
    Project risks are inevitable. That is why SDPC will make sure that all risk management avenues are covered and all risks are explored. A few risks that the SDPC project management team are anticipating are listed below:

    Washington, DC is a major city with many regulations and restrictions. Delays in getting permits for construction on time is a high possibility.
    To get the farmers’ market project completed for a normal operating season construction will need to start right away. The weather might be a hindrance in this plan.
    The Department of Health requires easy access to handwashing facilities for farmers’ market settings. If the permanent bathroom facilities do not meet this requirement portable washing stations for vendors will need to be implemented or a second bathroom facility will need to be constructed (Information Bulletin for Public Market Managers, 2014).

    Milestone schedule (summary)
    Several milestones will need to be met to complete The Fresh Harvest Farmers’ Market Project. Included in these milestones are start and completion dates that SDPC management team will need to keep. A strict time frame for completing the project will ensure the market being opened before the typical farmers’ market season begins in May, 2018.

    Milestone 1: Farmers’ market permits will need to be received

    Start Date:  April 2017
    Completion Date: May 2017

    Milestone 2: Receiving permits for construction/building on empty lot next to hospital

    Start Date: May 2017
    Completion Date: June 2017

    Milestone 3: Bathroom plumbing

    Start Date: July 2017
    Completion Date: July 2017

    Milestone 4: Pour concrete slab

    Start Date: August 2017
    Completion Date: September 2017

    Milestone 5: Construct pavilion

    Start Date: October 2017
    Completion Date: November 2017

    Milestone 6: Construct bathroom

    Start Date: November 2017
    Completion Date: January 2018

    Milestone 7: Parking lot permits

    Start Date: November 2017
    Completion Date: December 2017

    Milestone 8: Parking lot construction

    Start Date: December 2017
    Completion Date: February 2018

    Milestone 9: Sidewalk permits

    Start Date: February 2018
    Completion Date: March 2018

    Milestone 10: Sidewalk construction

    Start Date: March 2018
    Completion Date: April 2018

    Milestone 11: Landscaping

    Start Date: April 2018
    Completion Date: May 2018

    Budget (summary)
    The budget is based off independent cost estimates that SDPC have previously built with slight differences in the fees for Washington, DC permits and labor costs. This differs from location to location. The actual cost of building permits will depend on the location of your property and the specific type of work that will be performed there (Salvato, 2016).

    Project Phase
    Budget Cost

    Permits
    $10,000

    Pavilion/Bathroom Construction
    $400,000

    Parking lot/sidewalk construction
    $400,000

    Landscaping
    $100,000

    Overhead
    $90,000

    Award Fee (7%)
    $70,000

    Total
    $1,070,000

     
    Criteria for project approval
    The project must not exceed the $1,070,000 budget for permits, construction, landscaping, overhead, and award fees in this charter.  The selection of farmers and required vending/health permits must be completed by April 2017 before the project manager can approve the project.  The construction of the farmers’ market must meet DC building codes and FDA sanitation codes before May 2017.  The farmers’ market will be approved for WIC and CSFP, and receive the “Get Fresh” approval sign by May 2018 (DC, 2017).   The farmers’ market must secure the partnership with Food Trust by May 2017.  SDPC must provide blueprints for the construction of the farmers’ market to the project manager and project sponsor by April 2017.   The project manager and project sponsor will approve of and sign off on the project charter if at least 50% of the farmers’ market vendors have received their DC Vending A Licenses and DC Certified Food Protection ID by April 2017 (DC, 2017).  Once the project charter is signed, any additional amendments must be approved by the project manager and project sponsor on a case by case basis.
    Project Authority
    The construction of the Fresh Harvest Farmers’ market by SDPC will be under review by the appointed Oversight team from the Community Memorial Hospital. There will be monthly meetings with the project management team of SDPC and the oversight team for updates and issues regarding the project. It is also essential to seek the consent of the entire community who are the primary beneficiaries of this project (Laser, 2007).
    SDPC has authority on all materials used during the project. The CMH Oversight team has the final say on budgeting and architecture. All sets of standards and functionality regarding the project objectives will be reviewed by the CMH Oversight team.
    The project management team of SDPC will check the project for compliance on a regular basis to make sure the execution process is effective and complete all tasks at hand. CMH Oversight team will have the final inputs SDPC will be responsible for monitoring to ensure the project objectives are completed.
    Project manager and authority level
    Hera Haizel, the project manager and supervisor for SDPC will work together with the relevant authorities before and during the execution of the project to end up with a reasonable project that is compliant with all the set standards and appropriately serves the intended purpose (Crandall, Parnell, & Spillan, 2014).
    Project sponsor or customer and authority level
    Sunshine Design Planning Company will implement the project in coordination with all other stakeholders to make the project successful and benefit the target population and customers. The sponsor of the project is the Community Memorial Hospital. The CMH’s Oversight team will be the point of contact for the hospital during the project. The Project manager Hera will submit the budget and the blueprints of the construction work to the Oversight team for approval. Lastly, all emerging issues before and after the execution of project will be resolved by project administrators and local authorities where necessary (Indelicato, 2011).
    References
    Crandall, W., Parnell, J. A., & Spillan, J. E. (2014). Crisis management: Leading in the new strategy landscape (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    Indelicato, G. (2011). Delivering project excellence with the statement of work, (2nd ed) Project Management Journal, 42(1), 91-91. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmj.20228
    Information Bulletin for Public Market Managers. (2014). Department of Health Guidance [PDF]. Retrieved from https://doh.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/doh/publication/ attachments/New%20DOH%20Guidance%20For%20Farmer%27s%20Market.pdf
    Laser, M. (2007). Recent safety and environmental legislation. Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 85(2), 185-187. http://dx.doi.org/10.1205/psep.re.0702
    Salvato, R (2016). How much should you budget for building permits? The Final Review Retrieved from: https://www.burnhamnationwide.com/final-review-blog/how-much-should-you-budget-for-building-permits.
    Appendix B – Risk Register
     

    Risk ID
    Risk Description
    Consequence
    Likelihood
    Rank
    Strategy

    1
    Materials/Resource Cost
    Significant
     
     
     

    2
    Architecture/Design Errors
    Significant
     
     
     

    3
    Team, Staff conflict
    Minor
    Medium
     
     

    4
    Delays in meeting project objectives
    Major
    Low
     
     

    5
    Safety Hazards
    Major
    High
    High Risk
    Control

    6
    Stakeholder
    Significant
    Medium
    Medium Risk
    Control

    7
    Weather affecting or damaging site
    Significant
    Low
    Low Risk
    Accept

    8
    Delay in permit approvals and meeting DOH requirements
    Major
    Low
    Low Risk
    Accept

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