First Post Samples
Linda’s response:
Reading like a writer.  Demonstrating the problem exists and is serious.

Reread the title and the first paragraph. How do the title and the opening sentences hook the readers?

Bornstein’s choice of the title is clever. He properly succeeded to hook the reader who at the first glimpse would ask him/herself; how babies can stop the action of bullying?. Or are babies used as tools to fight such an aggressive behavior? Which I did and looked forward to read the essay. Additionally, the opening sentence made me curious and think twice that Is there in reality a cure for someone being mean to others?
In his first paragraph Bornstein unwrapped indirectly the meaning of bullying by being mean to others first in the opening sentence “a cure for meanness.” And then by using the term “mean girl.” He starts the paragraph with a real-life example published in news which is the suicide of a college student who has been electronically bullied. And in an article in The New York Times presenting the bad consequences of bullying of a girl in kindergarten. To support his thoughts about the existence of the problem and its serious bad results, Bornstein refers to mentioning that the federal government classifies bullying as “a national problem” and the first “Bullying Prevention Summit” held. Then the guidance letter released by the Department of Education encouraging schools and colleges to act actively to the serious issue of bullying. All these illustrations about the serious topic of bullying and its bad effects in the community.
Kevin’s response:
Analyze and Write: Reread the title and first paragraph. How do the title and the opening sentences hook readers?
Bornstein’s essay is titled, Fighting Bullying with Babies. When an individual thinks about fighting bullying, they think of a tough approach such as disciplining the bully. The title already hooks a reader once the baby portion is read. A reader would question why a baby would be able to counteract bullies. Moving onto the first few sentences, the first sentence already provides a sense of critical thinking, by saying, “Imagine there was a cure for meanness. Well, maybe there is” (415). These two sentences make a reader think of solutions on their own, which Bornstein will later elaborate his own solution with the Roots of Empathy program. If a reader is interested in learning about bullying or finding a solution to bullying, the title and the first two sentences alone should be able to hook them into the essay.
 

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