Course Project-Source Summary

Ch. 2: Topic, Angle, Purpose
Ch. 3: Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

Ch. 14: Inventing Ideas and Prewriting

Ch. 24: Starting Research

Ch. 22: Using Argumentative Strategies

Ch. 25: Finding Sources and Collecting Information

Ch. 26: Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Citing Sources (See esp. pp. 496–501)

Chapter 10: Arguments

Chapter 13: Research Papers

Chapter 15: Organizing and Drafting (pp. 359–360)

After reviewing the presentation, compose a 2-paragraph response in which you address each of the following points:

    • In your own words, identify points in the peer review cycle that seem especially important and explain why.
    • How does an editor differ from a peer reviewer? Use at least two points to support your response.
    • Based on this information, explain whether your article for this week was peer reviewed? How can you determine this information?
    • As you work on your research in this class, where specifically can you look to find peer-reviewed information?
    • In your own words, identify points in the peer review cycle that seem especially important and explain why.
    • How does an editor differ from a peer reviewer? Use at least two points to support your response.
    • Based on this information, explain whether your article for this week was peer reviewed? How can you determine this information?
    • As you work on your research in this class, where specifically can you look to find peer-reviewed information?After reviewing the presentation, compose a 2-paragraph response in which you address each of the following points:

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